An investment group plans to demolish the Cannon Street Power Station and create a second waterfront staging area for the coming offshore wind industry. We asked readers for their reaction to the news and they responded, on video and in comments.


Public park would be add value to New Bedford site

As a former resident who now lives in Boise, Idaho, and who works as a wind energy consultant, I follow with great interest the news of my hometown, especially as it relates to the wind industry. One thing that struck me about the discussion of the proposed plans for the Eversource site was the lack of any mention of a public park as a viable use for at least part of this parcel.

Having now lived in Boise for 22 years, I have come to appreciate that almost all new major developments come with some form of public access. The Boise River that meanders through town is bounded on both sides by a greenbelt ensuring public access to our own waterfront, while several destination parks known as the Ribbon of Jewels provide the public with open space, recreation, green space, and a place to escape the hustle and bustle of our rapidly growing city.

New Bedford should consider such an amenity for at least part of the Eversource site. A new park could be New Bedford’s own jewel, close both to downtown and the working waterfront. Most importantly, a park would provide a way for her citizens and tourists alike to connect with both the fishing and wind energy industries, strengthening those ties that have bound the city together for centuries.

— Matthew H. Bullard, Boise, Idaho

Great deal for New Bedford

This is just great news … Go, New Bedford!

— Richard Andre, Vineyard Power president, West Tisbury

Great news … but keep the area friendly for cyclists!

I support the plan. That said, as an avid cyclist who bikes the blue lane into downtown New Bedford, please, please, please be aware of the nasty intersection at Merrill’s when making plans. Increased traffic will only make it more dangerous. We want to continue to be bike friendly.

— Bettina Borders, New Bedford

It’s a wind-wind for New Bedford

This is a wonderful addition to New Bedford’s waterfront and long overdue! A plus all around, offshore wind and jobs!

— Suzanna Trimble, Dartmouth

Make sure turbine parts are American made

In regard to the story about the offshore wind farm being planned in New Bedford, I am curious to know exactly what turbines will be used to spin the blades off the coast of NB?

Will it be Vestas? I think their turbines and blades are made in the US. Will it be GE? They have some blades made in North Dakota. Mostly all of their turbines are imported from Europe.

Surely it will not be Xinjiang Goldwind of China. Not saying that they are implicated in this, but Xinjiang is home to tens of thousands of Muslim minorities held in captivity in China’s war on terrorism. The women there face forced sterilization. Thousands of prisoners work for free making everything from polysilicon for solar panels, to storing and packing cotton picked from Xinjiang farms.

The U.S. Senate just passed a bill to ban all commerce with Xinjiang, the province, of which Goldwind is based. If this is getting any state funding, the money should go to supporting American manufacturing jobs, not just temporary construction jobs or sales and marketing jobs, but jobs in making the wind blades, making the turbines.

My guess is they don’t know how the suppliers will be. I hope those in charge of the deal consider where these things are made first.

— Kenneth Rapoza, New Bedford

What do you think?

The city announced that the Cannon Street Power Station — once planned for an ocean aquarium and later for a waterfront casino — has been sold to investors looking to build a second staging area for the offshore wind industry. Do you think this will benefit city residents? How important is the proposed seafood off-loading infrastructure and “fish-centric” retail facility? What’s your general reaction to the news? Let us know and we’ll include your comments in Community Voices.

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